Monthly Archives: December 2010

The Seven Types of Waste #5: Overproduction.

A major contribution of the Toyota Production System (TPS) is its description of the seven categories of waste (or muda) in the typical production process. Reducing these wastes is the primary goal of a lean production process. (Lean=No Waste.) This is … Continue reading

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The Little Guy is More Important than the Big Boss

To successfully make a transition to lean production, you must have the support of top people in the organization. There are simply too many fundamental, revolutionary changes that have to happen when you become lean to try to get it … Continue reading

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The Seven Types of Waste #4: Overprocessing.

The Toyota Production System (TPS) lays out seven categories of waste (or muda) in the production process. The reduction of these wastes is the most important step in developing a lean production process. (Lean=No Waste.) This is the fourth in a … Continue reading

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Kanban and Fine-Tuning

One key difference between lean production and traditional mass-production is how necessary supplies are provided. Traditional mass production systems tend to use a push system in which the amount of supplies, and the schedule for generating them, is determined by … Continue reading

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Aggravation with a non-Lean doctor’s office

We took our kids to see a specialist today (they’re fine), and it showed clearly that despite how widespread lean concepts are becoming, there are many places that have never heard of them and BADLY need to. On the phone, … Continue reading

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The Seven Types of Waste #3: Motion

The Toyota Production System (TPS) describes seven different categories of waste (or muda) in the production process. The elimination of these wastes is the most important step in creating a lean production process. (Lean=No Waste.) This is the third in a … Continue reading

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Toward a Lean Laundry (Part 2)

In the last post, I explained that we are using lean production principles to improve our personal laundry procedures because our old way of doing laundry was full of wasted time, effort, money, motion and defects. After noting where the … Continue reading

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